Urban Teacher Education Program (UTEP) Course Descriptions

Cluster I: Educational Foundations Courses

There are three courses in Cluster I. These courses are open to all undergraduate and graduate students. Social Foundations of Urban Education is the “gateway” course: students apply to UTEP either while enrolled in this course or after completing the course. 

21:300:292-Social Foundations in Urban Education (3 credits)

This course examines the relationship between schools and society. Through an exploration of the scholarly field of social foundations (history, philosophy, and sociology of education) students explore the dynamic interaction between dominant ideology, political economy, and changes in American public schooling since its inception.  Special attention is given to the ideal relationship between democracy and urban schooling.  Students complete twenty hours of field experience, including a minimum of six hours with the Abbott Leadership Institute. 

Prerequisite: A minimum of a B in two English composition courses (101 and 102)

21:300:295-Adolescent Psychology and the Urban Experience (3 credits)

This course examines human development from puberty (10 to 12 years) to physiological maturation (18 to 19 years).  This course provides students with an understanding of psychological theories of human development and learning. The primary focus of this course is on the urban adolescent and the urban experience, specifically experiences in urban education.  Teacher candidates examine the relationship between development, and learning theories. This course discusses the behaviors and attitudes of urban adolescents and the challenges they face, and how those challenges influence and interact with academic achievement.  Furthermore, understanding moves from theory to practice by examining the differences in the way students receive information and how teachers can transmit information successfully. This course assists teacher candidates to better understand the opportunities and challenges they will face in an urban school.

21:300:297; 21:300:298; 21:300:299 21st Century Urban Educator (3 concurrent one-credit courses)

·  Limited English Proficiency (21:300:297)

·  Students with Disabilities and Gifted & Talented (21:300:298)

·  Literacy/Reading (21:300:299)

Note: This course will be revised as three separate components (see above).

In past years, this course examined the complexities of teaching and learning in urban schools, as well as how urban schools throughout the United States can be structurally and pedagogically transformed.  The course provided an overview of a wide range of topics related to how students learn, in an attempt to ensure that teacher candidates tailor instruction and management strategies to impact effective student learning. The complexities of teaching and learning in today’s urban classrooms including the great diversity of race, ethnicity, social class, language use, gender, sexual orientation, and ability among students were discussed.  The course concluded by examining how learning can be pedagogically transformed via the adept manipulation of the curriculum, differentiation, and the implementation of effective instructional strategies. 

Cluster II: Developmental Courses

There are two courses in Cluster II. Only accepted UTEP teacher candidates can advance beyond Cluster I. 

21:300:410-Information Communication and Technologies for Secondary Education (3 credits)

This course examines the integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into instruction to foster community, collaboration, conceptual development, and exceptional academic performance. The course pays particular attention to present and potential access and academic uses of ICT in under-resourced urban schools with racially, ethnically, and linguistically diverse students whose families tend not to be participants in the US society's culture of power.

21:300:390-Understanding Educational Evaluation (3 credits)

This course examines concepts related to educational evaluation, including methods of data gathering, interpretations of data, as well as understanding and use of findings to inform and improve classroom practice.  The course provides teacher candidates with the knowledge and tools of evaluation necessary to become proactive gatherers and users of data to plan and to improve instruction. Through this course, teacher candidates define and understand the various types of evaluations, how they are developed, administered, and analyzed, as well as their appropriate uses for the classroom.  This course enables teacher candidates to organize, carry out, and monitor activities such as planning and providing instruction, determining students’ achievements, grading, lesson planning, and improvement of student learning. In addition, it provides teacher candidates with a full understanding of the role of teachers in evaluation and introduces practical strategies for using various types of evaluations that provide valid and reliable information needed for a wide range of needs such as student progress, summative grading, districts and statewide tests, national and international measures of achievement.

 

Cluster III: Developmental Courses

There are two courses in Cluster III. Each of these courses is divided into two sections: a general seminar and a content specific seminar for each area of certification. Students enroll in both the general seminar and the content specific seminar matching their intended area of certification. 

21:300:388-Curriculum and Instruction In Secondary Classrooms (3 credits)

This course introduces teacher candidates to the concept of curriculum, how it has been developed throughout the 20th and 21st centuries in the United States, and how it will influence their classroom practice.  Particular attention is paid to the ways in which the larger social and political developments have influenced the curriculum of specific disciplines since World War II in America.  Topics include: Guidance documents at the national, state and local level; tensions between the overt, covert and hidden curricula. Field observations and meetings with actual high school teachers in the content area occur.  

21:300:386 Methods of Teaching Secondary Schools Seminar (1 credit)

Through this course teacher candidates develop the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective urban teachers, with a particular focus on understanding how students build ideas and the impact this has on practice.  The goal is to help teacher candidates plan and implement lessons that are based upon current state and national standards and that emphasize the following: 

·  A personal and relevant understanding of the content expected to teach by the state of New Jersey and local districts like Newark and Jersey City;

·  A deep knowledge of the ways in which students learn that content;

·  How to choose appropriate tasks that allow students to grapple with cognitively complex problems and issues;

·  Familiarity with curricular materials—especially those used in the Newark Public Schools and Jersey City Public Schools;

·  Choosing and using appropriate pedagogies that promote understanding;

·  Creation of a classroom atmosphere that fosters the development of conceptual understanding; and,

·  Helping students experience the content as processes that demand thought, creativity and understanding.

In sum, this course is designed to help teacher candidates to become reflective teachers who can incorporate these ideas into their own classrooms with a high degree of fidelity and integrity.  It is also designed to help teacher candidates to become life-long learners so that they grow in ways that continually enhance their teaching practice.

21:300:38 Methods of Teaching Secondary Schools Content Specialty (2 credits)

In addition to the general discussions in the seminar, teacher candidates enroll in the content specific section of the course to focus their understanding of methods for teaching within secondary schools on their area of certification. Teacher candidates examine the use of resources to enact and augment the curriculum; how to implement interdisciplinary instruction; how to differentiate instruction diverse learners including: special needs, gifted and English language learners; the integration of assessment into curriculum implementation and how to provide feedback and analyze student work for lesson effectiveness.


Cluster IV: Clinical Courses

NOTE: Only TCs with a Passing PRAXIS II score on file and who have met all clinical entry requirements are permitted to advance into Cluster IV: Clinical Courses.

There are four courses in Cluster IV. The clinical courses form a one school-year (September-May) residency program. Teacher candidates experience instructional directions and daily school routines under the supervision of an identified cooperating teacher (CT), university-provided content specialist (CSE) and university clinical instructor (C4E) in an accredited school within Newark Public Schools or Jersey City Public Schools. Clinical I: Practicum Seminar and Clinical I: Practicum Experience are taken concurrently in the fall semester only.  Clinical II: Student Teaching Seminar and Clinical II: Student Teaching Experience are taken concurrently in the spring semester only. During the winter session between Clinical I: practicum and Clinical II: student teaching, a two-week seminar takes place in Liberty Science Center and Rutgers University, Newark. As part of the residency program, teacher candidates will participate in the Multiple Evaluations of Teaching Activities. The META cycleis a cycle of review, evaluation and feedback for teacher candidates. During the cycle within the field experience, six formative evaluations will occur as well as a final summative evaluation.   

Upon successful completion of the above courses, a capstone project (POWER portfolio and edTPA and participation in the Great Urban Teacher Symposium: Portfolio Exhibition (GUTS), teacher candidates are eligible for NJ Teacher Certification for Secondary Education.

 

21:300:418:01 Clinical I: Practicum Seminar (1 credit) fall semester only

In a student-centered, differentiated environment, teacher candidates create and become a part of a professional learning community. In this learning community teacher candidates investigate and practice the process of planning, instructing and engaging students in learning, assessment of student learning, reflecting on the teaching process and sharing and reviewing research-based best teaching practices. Using field experiences as a basis, this course explores the process of teaching effectively and addressing the needs of a variety of learners in the urban setting. During the semester, teacher candidates begin to design their POWER portfolio and collect edTPA artifacts for submission at the end of the semester. 

21:300:419:01 Clinical I: Practicum Experience (2 credits) fall semester only

Teacher candidates are assigned to a school site in the Newark Public Schools or Jersey City Public Schools for their field experience starting in September. Candidates complete a minimum of 170 hours (starting 2016) of on-site activities including observing and assisting the cooperating teacher (CT), writing and implementing daily lessons and/or implementation of units of study, and other activities as required by the Clinical I instructor. These activities must be documented (maintained in a journal/log) by the teacher candidate for submission at the end of the semester. During the course of the semester, teacher candidates are responsible for coordinating and scheduling CT, University Supervisor, and Subject Area Specialists’ observations/evaluations. Teacher candidates undergo at least 3 formal clinical evaluations of their teaching to be completed by their CTs and university supervisors.

21:300:487 Clinical II: Student Teaching Seminar (3 credits) spring semester only

Through the systematic and collaborative examination of the art and science of teaching, student teacher candidates engage in gathering knowledge and skills that reflect and enhance best practices in curricula development, student learning and assessment, and teacher professional development. Having successfully completed Clinical I: Practicum Seminar and Field courses, student teacher candidates further engage in amassing and developing pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge and concomitant skills. During the semester, teacher candidates continue to design their POWER portfolio and collect edTPA artifacts for submission at the end of the semester.  

Through the cyclical process of planning lessons, peer observation and critique of lesson implementation, and reflection on and revision of lessons, student teacher candidates learn from teaching to have a more accurate understanding of how subject matter content is taught and learned, and be able to more readily identify, collect, analyze, and use multiple and varied forms of data to assess student learning. Student teacher candidates are immersed in and see modeled the very practices that many teachers are being asked to use. At the end of the semester, teacher candidates submit their POWER portfolio and edTPA artifacts for external grading. Additionally, at the end of the semester, all teacher candidates participate in the Great Urban Teacher Symposium (GUTS): Portfolio Exhibition. In the context of this exhibition, student teacher candidates demonstrate, through the careful selection, analysis, and description of portfolio artifacts, thorough knowledge and understanding of each of UTEP’s SUPER6 Principles.

21:300:488 Clinical II: Student Teaching Experience (3 credits) spring semester only

Student teacher candidates are in their assigned school placement full-time as per the established district calendar and school-day schedule of their assigned Cooperating Teacher (CT). All on-site activities – observations of the CT, peer observations, implementation of daily lessons, implementation of longer units of study, and other activities as required by the Clinical II instructor – must be documented (maintained in an annotated journal/log) by the student teacher candidate for submission at the end of the semester. During the course of the semester, student teacher candidates are responsible for coordinating and scheduling CT, University Supervisor, and Subject Area Specialists’ observations/evaluations. 

Electives for UTEP

21:300:462 Urban and Cultural Leadership (3 credits)

The Urban and Cultural Leadership Seminar is a culturally based leadership experience for undergraduate students.  Through a comprehensive learning experience, students are exposed to leadership models and provided opportunities to explore current leadership theories including Kouzes & Posner Leadership Challenges, the Social Change Model of Leadership, the theory of Servant Leadership, the community leadership principles Charismatic versus Citizen based leadership, and the Iceberg Theory of organizational change. The participants will be challenged to examine the unique economic, political and social characteristics that shape the urban experience. 

Restricted Electives for UTEP

Only students admitted to UTEP are permitted to take the electives below.

21:300:427-Supervised Teaching (3 credits)
Independent study supervised by the instructor for 21:300:487-Clinical II: Student Teaching and Seminar. This course investigates selected topics in education. See Program Coordinator for Special Permission Number.
Co-requisite: 21:300:487-Clinical II: Student Teaching and Seminar

21:300:428-Supervised Teaching (3 credits)
Independent study supervised by the instructor for 21:300:487-Clinical II: Student Teaching and Seminar. This course investigates selected topics in education. See Program Coordinator for Special Permission Number.
Co-requisite: 21:300:487-Clinical II: Student Teaching and Seminar

21:300:395-Special Topics (3 credits)
Independent study supervised by a member of the department. For qualified students who wish to investigate a specific area or topic in education in greater depth than is normally covered elsewhere in the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

21:300:398-Research in Education (3 credits)
Independent study supervised by a member of the department. For qualified students who wish to investigate a specific area or topic in education in greater depth than is normally covered elsewhere in the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

21:300:397-Internship
Fieldwork at accredited educational agencies under the supervision of a departmental faculty member and an agency supervisor. This placement in a suitable off-campus educational organization encourages students to understand and to test the applicability of their classroom educational experiences. Eight to 10 hours per week of work, weekly log of internship-related activities, and a final paper are required.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Should you be interested in previewing UTEP’s course syllabi, stop by our main office located in Bradley Hall room 151. 

Department of Urban Education
110 Warren Street, Bradley Hall - 1st Floor, Room 151, Newark, NJ 07102
973-353-3528